Bandera Gone With the Wind

I still remember what a certain Svidomite troll on my old blog, Austere Insomniac, said of the church of Dmitry Sydor. Dmitry Sydor was an Orthodox priest, and a Carpatho-Rusyn activist, and his church was struck by lightning which toppled the cross upon the dome of the church. He interpreted it as a sign of God’s displeasure…

Dmitry Sydor was then persecuted for separatism, that was still under the presumably pro-Russian Yanukovych, and allegations were made against him that he received money from the Russian World Fund. Meanwhile though, Western funds, Soros and others were operating freely and several years later, the people on Western payroll ousted Yanukovych. This is to remind anyone who thinks that Russia should have engaged in buying influence in Ukraine the way West did. Russia did not have an even playing field in Ukraine. Besides, going against the collective West in the game of buying influence was a losing proposition from the beginning.

But weather signs have been rich this winter, strong winds have destroyed a supersized portrait of Stepan Bandera in Ternopol, Halychyna, Ukraine.

The gods hate Bandera too, not just Poles, Russians, and Belarusians, and just about anyone in Ukraine and around it. Even more ominous image has been generated on the other side of the country, in Kharkov.

The wind has split in two the national flag of Ukraine. Funny that the Ukrainian flag is associated with the homeland of Bandera and contains in it the colours from the coat of arms of Lvov, that is a golden lion on an azure field. A variant of this flag was given to the people of Halychyna by Empress Sophie as a thank you for help in suppressing the Hungarian revolt. Emperor Franz Joseph called them Tyrolleans of the East.

The Tyrolleans were the epitome of loyalty in Austria because they stood loyal to the Habsburgs when Napoleon invaded. The Ukrainian flag was introduced to Russian Ukraine by Sichovi Striltsy, a group formed of Ukrainian nationalists that was originally part of the Austrian army.

The Pyrrhic Victory of Svidomites Over Netfix Zrada

For Svidomites and Zrada, please consult my Glossary of Terms.

It looks like svidomites have won from Netflix a change of subtitles at the film Brat 2. Now instead of “Ukrainian Nazi Collaborator” it says “Banderite”. But is this a peremoha? While the Western audience does understand a little about Nazi collaboration, it may use Google to find out what Banderite is. They will find Wikipedia

The term derives from the name of Stepan Bandera (1909-1959), head of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists that formed in 1929 as an amalgamation of movements including the Union of Ukrainian Fascists.[1][2] The union, known as OUN-B, had been engaged in various atrocities, including murder of civilians, most of whom were ethnic Poles. This was the result of the organization’s extreme Polonophobia, but the victims also included other minorities such as the Jews and Romani people.[3][4] The term “Banderites” was used by the Bandera followers themselves, by others during the Holocaust, and during the massacres of Poles in Volhynia and Eastern Galicia by OUN-UPA from 1943–1944. These massacres resulted in the deaths of 80,000-100,000 Poles and 10,000-15,000 Ukrainians.[5]

And here dear readers is how a peremoha slowly turns into zrada…

Netflix Zrada

For the meaning of Zrada, check out the Glossary…

Netflix featured the Russian crime drama Brat 2 on its site, and they have translated a scene where one of the characters asks two Ukrainians if they are banderovites, that is followers of the radical nationalist leader, Stepan Bandera, this way:

It is difficult not to claim that Bandera wasn’t collaborating with the Nazis. However, some in Ukraine are ashamed of this fact apparently. A parliamentarian from the ruling party, Dmytro Hrudin, said that Netflix had no right to do this. He promised they initiate a writing campaign. They can of course do that, but the international public understands why Bandera is hated, and does not even know who Bandera is…

I really wonder how the entire dialogue is translated. I might watch it later tonight…

Source

Cuckolds and Patsies for Stepan Bandera

The other day, Russian media like Zvezda.TV and Tsargrad.TV ran a story that declassified CIA documents call Bandera a “fascist” and a “spy for Hitler”…

But on a closer inspection, the document in question turns out to be a translation from a Soviet propaganda publication Sotsialisticheskiy Vestnik. However, reading through the documents on the CIA website, I came across another translation from the Soviet press. Vladimir Belyayev writes in the Literaturnaya Gazeta that the OUN sent saboteurs into the USSR in the post-War years. And then there is this…

Throughout the post war years, the “Fuehrer” of the Ukrainian nationalistti Stepan Benders., alias “Popel”, lived in Munich until he met his infamous death on the stone steps of house No.7 on Kraytmayershtrasse. The fifty year old priest’s son, from the village of Staryy Ugrinov, was cruel, greedy, ready to commit any crime for profit. He divided his time equally between the struggle for “independent Ukraine” and petty debauchery, forcing the wives of his followers and those of the “couriers” sent to the Ukraine, to cohabit with him.

It may or may not be true. Here are some photos of Bandera from around that period…
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Another Out-of-the-closet Banderophile From the Russian Opposition Discovered

My friend sent me the following screenshot. Looks like many Russian liberals openly embrace Stepan Bandera, and the regime in Ukraine. After Ruslan Shaveddinov and Ilya Novikov, here comes Kirill Naumov.

Kirill Naumov: Volunteer of the Navalny Team, European, Orthodox Russian Nationalist, Democrat and Banderovite

There is another, even more curios text on his photo, it says in Ukrainian: “Hands off from volunteers and soldiers.” It is likely one of those campaigns that seeks impunity for Ukrainian myrmidons that fought in the East of the country. You see, many of them have PTSD and other psychological problems, and they get caught for serious crimes like robberies and murder. There exists a group of people that thinks this constitute a campaign of persecution against patriotic defenders of the motherland.

I understand some Ukrainian villager from Lvov or Cherkasy may feel strongly about this but that a Russian would put this into his profile picture suggests mental illness.

Here is the fool’s Facebook profile

Stepan Bandera Suffocated Cats

I was interested in verifying an old claim made by Oles’ Buzyna…

In an essay, “Bandera, the Suffocator of Cats”, the late journalist, Oles’ Buzyna made the claim that the young Stepan Bandera liked suffocating cats. He quoted a biographical book by Halyna Hordasevych, Stepan Bandera, the Person and The Myth, where it said this:

If the incident with cats really took place, it was not out of an inborn tendency toward sadism, but out of a boyish and perhaps not so smart wish to test oneself, would he be able to kill another being? Since on the path of revolution, that Stepan Bandera has chosen, he would have to kill ennemies.

This, it needs to be noted, is a favourable biography from a fangirl. And while I trust Oles’ Buzyna’s integrity, I had to verify this information anyway.

So I requested a friend in Kiev to get me this book. He said the bookseller was very happy because apparently few were after this kind of literature. Neither was I going to read it, I was only looking for that particular quote:

The book cover:

Young Stepan Bandera (on the right) as a plastun: